Pts: Third Rail and Line Essay

Submitted By GuitarGaming-Carter
Words: 2258
Pages: 10

KEYPOINTS

PERSONAL
TRACK SAFETY
(PTS)

Issue eight valid from December 2011
Certification required: Current Sentinel
Card endorsed with PTS competency

Keypoint Cards have been produced for many of the track safety competencies, as a reminder of the main duties, rules and requirements.
Further copies are available from Willsons Group Services.
To obtain an order form, email:

denise@willsons.com
(phone 01636 702334 or fax 01636 701396)

INFRASTRUCTURE AND TERMINOLOGY
Track layout cess six-foot

four-foot

four-foot

ten-foot

six-foot

cess

four-foot

four-foot

‘On or near the line’ and ‘lineside’

lineside
3 metres (10 feet)

on or near the line

platform
1.25 metres (4 feet)

1

Running lines
Running lines are used by trains to go from place to place.
Each running line has a name, speed limit and direction.
Details are given in the Sectional Appendix.

Position of safety

position of safety

1.25 metres (4 feet)

2 metres (6 feet 6)

101-125 mph 0-100 mph Lightweight tools and equipment must be left at least 2 metres
(6 feet 6 inches) from the line, irrespective of the speed limit.

Authorised walking route
An authorised walking route provides safe access to or from a place of work. These are often found near depots, stations and signalboxes. Details are given in the Hazard Directory.

2

Electrified lines
Consider all electrification equipment to be live at all times.
Overhead line equipment
(OLE) provides trains with
25,000 volts AC. You must treat the OLE as being live at all times. Cables attached to these structure must be considered to be live as well.
Make sure you and anything you’re holding doesn’t come within 2.75 metres (9 feet) of live OLE.
Take extra care when working:
 at height (on platforms, embankments, bridges)
 with metal equipment or liquids.

Conductor rails (third rails) provide trains with up to
750 volts DC. The live rail is raised on insulating pots.
Cables attached to these rails must be considered to be live as well.
Make sure you and anything you’re holding doesn’t come into contact with a conductor rail. You must stand 300mm
(1 foot) away from the third rail.
Make sure you:
 use insulated tools, troughs and appropriate PPE
 take extra care when working with liquids or near floodwater.

3

RAILWAY SIGNS

No position of safety on this side of the railway

Refuges on other side of the railway but not this side

Lineside phone

Signal post telephone Phone to electrical control room

General railway phones (often found at level crossings)

Tel No:
04 65239

Phones in areas of limited clearance.

4

GOING ONTO THE RAILWAY
Only go ‘on or near the line’ if absolutely necessary.
Make sure you:
 have your Sentinel card with you
 wear the necessary approved PPE and suitable workwear
 know the speed and direction of approaching trains
 know any hazards which might affect your safety
 walk in a position of safety and face traffic, if possible
 take extra care in junction areas.

Approved PPE

5

WHEN A TRAIN APPROACHES
You must be in a position of safety at least 10 seconds before a train arrives.
When a train approaches:
 stop what you are doing and

go to the position of safety straight away
 acknowledge the driver’s

warning by raising one arm above your head
 watch the train go past.

Do not leave the position of safety unless you are sure no other trains are approaching.

CROSSING THE LINE
If you have to cross the line:
 make sure there’s sufficient sighting distance and no trains

are approaching
 go straight across without stepping on rails or sleepers
 take care near points - your foot could get trapped
 check there is a position of safety on the opposite site.

On lines with conductor rails:
 find a gap or a place where protective guarding is provided
 step over the running rail and conductor rail together.

6

WALKING IN A GROUP AND WORKING
The COSS
When a group needs to walk or work on or near the line, a COSS sets up a Safe System of Work to make sure nobody is…